Thursday, February 08, 2007

Ask FS! 2/8/07

Welcome back loyal readers! It's time once again for the column that keeps on truckin', Ask FS! Today's question floats in from the Peerless who wonders,
Why is it that so many Czech and Slovak hockey players (Hejduk, Novy, Kraft, Jurcina, etc.) are named for a town in northern Italy??
Great question, man without peers. The answer can be found deep in Austrian history.

After the Treaty of Utrecht ended the War for Spanish Succession in 1713, the Austrian Empire became the reigning hegemon over the Italian peninsula. Under the Hapsburg emperors, the Austrian Empire gained control over large portions of northern Italy by annexing the the Kingdoms of Venice and Genoa. During the time the Hapsburgs controlled the northern Italian states, they also controlled the Slavic areas that are now the Czech Republic and Slovakia. During this time, cultural diffusion lead to a mingling of the areas all under the Hapsburg empire at the time. As a result, there is a large influence of Northern Italy in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. I hope this history lesson has been helpful Peerless!

And for the record, I looked none of that up. It helps sometime to have a degree in History.

Remember, if you have a question you'd like to see answered in a future edition of "Ask FS!" just drop a question in the comments section below, or use the email link in the profile. Until next time, LET'S GO CAPS!

5 comments:

The Peerless said...

Wow! . . . The Peerless is without peer in the degree to which he is impressed!!

Austrian history . . . whodathunkit??

Meghann said...

NERD! :)

The Jet said...

heres a question for u FS: how do you see the state of hockey in 2011, when Gary Bettman's contract expires?

Victor said...

I have one for you, FS: When Bettman dies, which circle of Hell will he find himself condemned to?

Victor said...

Got another one: Is Cute Camera Girl the one who is stationed in the camera well in front of section 114? Just want to make sure we're talkin' about the same girl, here.